HEATERS: Catalytic Type

Culture Orchid Doctor

by Robert M. [Bert] Hamilton (Compiler)

Originally published in The Orchid Doctor in 1980 and 1988

Posted by Sys Admin almost 4 years ago.

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Such as made by Coleman; it is not proven but presumably they should not generate ethylene. A77-922; they are approved for emergency heating, although the amount of heat produced is low. A75-35; A78-1124
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Heating Comments
HEATERS: Back-up for Main Unit If it is ever used in emergency there should be a guarantee obtained from the dealer that it will not produce ethylene when it is used; get a written guarantee. A80-1140 0
HEATERS: Emergency Electric heater causes parching of plants; deflect the hot air stream away from plants, increase the humidity; or, try a polyethylene tube prepunched with holes. A77-619Manually operated propane burner would be satisfactory; be sure to provide enough oxygen. A71-439; A71-917; A72-55One or two propane heaters without controls will be satisfactory; natural gas is even preferred. A78-226 0
HEATERS: Emergency, for Greenhouses Aladdin series of kerosene heaters are recommended; should burn properly adjusted. A72-631 0
HEATERS: Emergency System If the emergency heater fails to operate the last hope is to use water as a continual spray over the plants to avoid freezing and to achieve at least survival of the plants; use a follow-up of fungicide on the plants to avoid mass black rot. A83-1183Space heaters capable of running 20 hours at full fire run on gas or propane in which the pilot light activates its own thermostat; details in Ca85(1)-9 0
HEATERS: Flue Pipe with Fins Make your own: on a roll of lightweight lawn edging aluminum four inches high use shears to cut slits 5/8 in. apart from the lower edge inward for 3in. along a length necessary to wind it up spirally over the flue stack to its top and then secure it with wire, rivets or metal screws; it recovers about 50% of otherwise wasted stack heat. A83-153 0
HEATERS: For Emergency in Case Power Fails Hy-Lo Salamander burns either kerosene or range-oil; it is an ethylene risk; use kerosene; arrange a temporary vent to the outside; burn as bright a flame as possible. A74-114 0
HEATERS: Gas or Propane A gas heater if exclusively methane can be used without venting; propane has up to 0.6% ethylene and needs proper venting A81-1093 0
HEATERS: Gas Space Units A small unit providing 22-to-50,000 BTU in which the pilot light activates a small electrical pile which in turn activates a thermostat called Self Generating, or Capillary Tube, is described, to take either natural gas (must be vented) or propane (which, if unvented, provides 40% more heat with more carbon dioxide and water); refer to Ca85(l)-9 0
HEATERS: Infra-red New Types They are efficient systems that use either natural gas or propane/butane mix to fire burners and a special pipe emits infrared waves which heat the plant benches, the floor, etc,x and not the air; for advt. refer to A84-1337 0
HEATERS: Kerosene New Types A 9000-BTU-per-hour heater can produce sulfur dioxide levels during overnight use, a principal air pollutant which is "controlled" by the U.S. Environment Protection Agency to prevent injury; ventilation of one air eschange per hour is necessary; outside air can take a lot of heating; K-l kerosene can be below standard frequently; sensitive plants are Ludisia discolor, Vanilla planifolia, Dendrobium pierardii, D. primulinum. A82-878Caused sepal wilt and deformation because ethylene gas was emitted; but the Kero-Sun Heater apparently is not supposed to emit ethylene. A81-810Experience indicates problems in greenhouses such as bud-blasting and plant damage caused by sulfur dioxide; carbon dioxide and monoxide are not harmful to plants in lower concentrations. A83-266Modern space heaters in greenhouses should be vented in and out, like a furnace; they consume oxygen and produce noxious fumes. A82-37; -1061; A86-1141Sepal wilt, leaf yellowing both followed an installation; air must be s... 0
HEATERS: Quartz Electric Type It is satisfactory for greenhouse use but perhaps is not adequate because it affects plants only in its pathway and costs more. A81-1093 0
HEATERS: Unvented A heater using natural gas, no shortage of air and a clean burner is satisfactory. A81-266The flame consumes the oxygen in a tight greenhouse and the flame then does not burn properly and fumes begin to build up; so once again, use a vent. A87-290 0
HEATERS: Wood-burning Furnaces In Maine with a possible wind-chill factor of minus 80 dF, a furnace of 125,000 BTU, with hot air, taking a 30inch stick of wood, vented to the outside is described; specifications, names of suppliers, etc. given; you may have to sleep beside it on the worst winter nights. A82-1025 0
HEATERS: Wood-burning Stove It is apt to emit too much ethylene if it is not properly vented; burning wood is one of the worst sources of ethylene; it is now a crime to burn wood for heating purposes in London. A81-1436 0
HEATERS: Wood-burning Stoves They are not recommended because they ruin most orchids unless the draft is fully open at all times to discharge fumes into the neighbour's back yard. A81-526 0
HEATING CABLES: Use for Try growing mature Doritaenopsis and Phalaenopsis in the greenhouse on one for better performance; it should be linked to a thermostat control. OIE85Jy-15; RMH 0
HEATING: Costs and How to Reduce Them Adopt partial underground construction of greenhouses, lots of insulation, a southern exposure, double glazing with plastic film, airtightness, the installation of passive heat storers (steel drums filled with water). A80-100 0
HEATING: Emergency Water will flow till it freezes and as it freezes it releases heat, so saturate the greenhouse with water when the emergency heater conks out on the coldest night; keep it going until heating is resumed. A83-1183 0
HEATING: Emergency Systems An alarm system described, as well as three types of emergency heating apparatus; refer to A64-121+ 0
HEATING: Greenhouses The Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station's system of heating is fully described and illustrated; refer to A64-547 0
HEATING: Infrared This type heats plants directly instead of the surrounding air; growth doubled and root vigor increased dramatically in one installation; gas consumption is one-tenth of what was used in summer (California); Wll-164; 50% more fuel efficient. Wll-212 0
HEATING: Infra-red Heat In greenhouses it promotes vigor in leaves and roots and flowers at an economical cost; the units use propane/butane, or natural gas; for details refer to A85-222 0
HEATING: Infra-red Heat Lamps Are suitable, providing there are no emissions of light in the 600 to 700 Mu range; the true infra-red range will not affect photoperiodicity of the plants. A74-433 0
HEATING: Kerosene Heaters They are safe if vented to the exterior; if there are few flowers to be injured they may be used unvented if adjusted to burn properly. A74-969 0
HEATING: Kerosene Stove Use it only in an emergency; adjust it to a smokeless flame. A78-226 0
HEATING: Lp Gas Heater Unvented it causes yellowing of the leaves and bud drop; it produces ethylene gas; not recommended. A70-345 0
HEATING: Oil Stove Satisfactory if vented to the outside; adjust the flame to burn blue to yellow with no smoke, A71-715 0
HEATING: Wood-burning Stove It could be injurious to the flowers; burning wood emits ethylene; well-vented and not dampered it should be safe. A74-300 0
HEATING: Wood Stove It is not recommended because wood burning produces ethylene, even when vented. A78-13 0

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