Orchid doctor

BOTRYTIS: Cause and Cure

Ailments Orchid Doctor

by Robert M. Hamilton (Compiler)

Originally published in The Orchid Doctor in 1980 and 1988

Posted by Sys Admin over 1 year ago.

Article Blog   Article Index
An ever-present fungus; causes small round brown spots on flowers; decaying organic matter under the bench is a good source; best control is to keep water off the flowers; give good air circulation. A60-293; AH35; OD71-198
Share on Social Media:  
Log in to Add a Comment

More The Orchid Doctor Articles under the Heading Botrytis

Botrytis Comments
BOTRYTIS CINEREA: A Saprophyte Flourishes on decaying leaves, flowers, flower sheaths, leaf axils, organic debris on benches and floors, multiplies under conditions of excessive damp and cold; produces unsightly brown to black spots on flowers. OD67-49 0
BOTRYTIS: Controls A condition of high humidity over twelve hours causes the spores to sprout and causes death of cells; it sporulates off dying or dead organic matter; maintain night temperatures in mid- to upper-50's dF to dry the air; for details refer to OA80-140Botrytis cineraria is a fungus easily controlled by Benlate spray on plants and stems (it spots the flowers); plus cleanliness and good air movement. A82-690It is common in fall and spring when night temperatures are in the 50's dF with high humidity, when water condenses on the plants and flowers, where spores can germinate in four hours and penetrate, causing ugly spotting; stop the droplets from forming either by increasing air movement or by higher temperature. A83-343Spray Benlate three times at fortnightly intervals and monthly thereafter; clean up the greenhouse. OR81-101Use Benlate spray, occasionally alternated with Fore, or Dithane M-45; Ornalin, and Chipco 26019 are other recently introduced controls. AH86-70Use Captan WP at ltt... 0
BOTRYTIS: Flower Spotting Caused by Botrytis cinerea; occurs generally on cymbidiums, but also infects cattleyas and phalaenopsis; cool conditions favor infection (45 to 65 deg, F); clean culture is essential; to date no chemical control available; Termil fumigation partly successful. A68-227+ 0
BOTRYTIS: On Orchid Blossoms Fungus spores germinate during humid conditions, usually at night; there are six kinds that do this; a drop in humidity plus clear days will stop development; fans that produce gentle but definite air movement help. A65-536; on leaves. A64-58 0
BOTRYTIS: Petal Blight It can affect flowers in moist, cool and stagnant air; increase air movement and ventilation; spray with Benlate or Physan 20; illus. A66-558; A75-907 (illus); A77-436; cut off flowers. S204 0
BOTRYTIS: Time Lag to Its Visibility It takes normally 10 to 12 hours to show on cattleya flowers. A80-110 0
New Topics
  1. Greg Barne asked question Using triacontanol on orchids in category General Discussion
  2. Image Carol Holdren started topic Orchid History in category General Discussion
  3. Tom De Mello asked question Dendrobium wardianum in category Dendrobiums
  4. Dave 1 Dave Groffen started topic Dendrobium sutiknoi hybrids in category Dendrobiums
New Comments
  1. Image Carol Holdren commented on topic "Using triacontanol on orchids" by Greg Barne
  2. Img 20180409 125831 Andry Harmony commented on member plant Phal. bellina by Andry Harmony
  3. James J Pupelis commented on orchid Paph. Jackie Sue
  4. Image Carol Holdren commented on scheduled event "Cattleya Symposium " by Odom's Orchids
  5. Bio Alex Maximiano commented on member plant B. Kiilani Stars by Nestor Moreno Martinez
  6. Bio Alex Maximiano commented on member plant Ctpsta. Leona 'Popper' by Carol Holdren
  7. Steve Maben commented on member plant Aergs. hariotiana by Tom Kuligowski
  8. Bio Alex Maximiano commented on member plant Phal. Tying Shin Fly Eagle by Phillip Ting
  9. Img 1288 Maria Mantellini commented on member plant C. lueddemanniana ''Doral'' by Maria Mantellini
  10. Image Carol Holdren commented on topic "Dendrobium wardianum " by Tom De Mello